Boiler feedwater pumps need to “breathe,” equalizing pressure when air expands and contracts due to temperature fluctuations or startup/shutdown situations. This breathing allows ingression of moisture and particulates.
If oil analysis is showing particulate or water contamination of your machine lubricant, one of the key places to look is the technical specs related to the equipment. The details of what’s in and on the machine often shed some light on possible contamination causes.
Inspection at the machine is the right time to check not only oil level, but also things like temperature, sight and smell. Is the lubricant dark, discolored or foamy? These notes may be your first indication that something’s amiss.
The fundamental purpose of oil analysis is to make sure the oil is capable of doing this important job. But you can learn a lot more from oil analysis than whether your lubricant is any good – if you get some real experts on your side, you do a comprehensive oil analysis program and you stick with it.
Underrated Overlooked Banner
Every lubricant is subject to different conditions, processes and iffy human behavior throughout your facility (and even before it gets there). And at every turn is risk. From a lubricant’s arrival, to its storage, transfer and application, and throughout its life cycle, what happens can have a big impact on the viability of your lubricant.
It’s never just about that low level or water contamination. It’s always about many different factors acting together to lead to the current situation. Your issue is going to be closely related to multiple, ever-changing factors involving your process, your machine and your facility.
Trico’s President, on the Need to Keep Growing Lubrication Knowledge.